Ada County

"Pacific Coast Business Directory for 1876-78," Compiled By Henry G. Langley, Editor of the California State Register, Pacific Coast Almanac, San Francisco, 1875. Gazetteer and Business Directory of Idaho Territory

Organized in 1864. Bounded on the north by Boise and Idaho Counties, east by the same and Alturas, south by Owyhee County, and west by Owyhee and the State of Oregon. Area, 5,200 square miles. Assessed valuation of property for 1874, $1,230,857. County seat, Boise City, the capital of the Territory. The only other town of any importance in the county is that of Middleton, situated at a distance of twenty--five miles from Boise City. Resources, principally agricultural. Although the general surface of the county is mountainous, fertile tracts of agricultural lands occur in the vicinity of the river bottoms. The valley of the Weiser contains about 200,000 acres of excellent farming land, capable of producing all kinds of cereals, and the same is now being rapidly settled by an industrious class of farmers. Saw and grist mills are also undergoing construction. Large game, such as bear and deer, is plaintiful in the valley. The valleys of the Boise and Payette rivers, which flow through the center of the county, are susceptible of the most profitable cultivation, the average yield of crops obtained being estimated at forty bushels per acre. The Boise Valley, which is sixty miles long and possesses a general width of from ten to fifteen miles, contains an area of arable land of about two hundred and forty square miles. The southern boundary of the county is watered by the Snake River. The climate is warm and pleasant in summer, and seldom reaches extremes in winter, but the season of 1871-5 was exceptional, the temperature sinking to 24° below zero, the rivers and water courses freezing, and large immbers of cattle, wild animals and fowls perished by cold. The custom of the country istoleavecattle to range during winter, and that it is regarded as a good region for the stock grower is proof of a milder climate than prevails in the same latitude in the Eastern States. Large numbers of rabbits have been regarded as a pest by the farmers, as are the ground squirrels in California, and these are reported to have been almost exterminated by the cold of 1875.

Officers: J. G. Peck, Probate Judge; N. M. Hanthorn, County Clerk, Recorder, and Auditor; Frank E. Ensign, District Attorney; James D. Agnew, Sheriff; Charles Bilderback, Treasurer; J. M. Thompson, Tax Collector, and Assessor; William Randall, Surveyor; C. North, Coroner; J. H. Whitson, Superintendent Public Schools.

Boise City, Ada Co, P O. Incorporated, Capital of the Territory, and County seat, is situated on the north bank of the Boise River, in latitude 43° 30', and longitude 116, and at an elevation above the sea of 2250 feet, The town site was surveyed July 7, 1863, being formerly used as a trading post by the Hudson Bay Fur Company, and was the general rendezvousof the trappers, traders, and emigrants of that region. It now commands the trade of the extensive, but only partl.v developed mining region of the western slope of the Rocky Mountains, lying in its immediate vicinity; and also of the agricultural district, in the midst of which it is situated. Boise City is the seat of the Penitentiary, and contains a number of other important public buildings. The Idaho World of March, 1875, says: " A little less than twelve years ago we stood on the site where now stands Idaho's fair and lovely capital; then without a human habitation. Savages, intent on foraying and murder, lurked on every side; and nearly every night bands of stock belonging to packers or to immigrants were stampeded, driven away up or across Snake River, not, usually, to be recovered. Now Boise Valley is charming with the chaste and quiet splendor of its well tilled farms and happy homes. Herds, numbering thousands, feed undisturbed on foot-hill and plain, and the ever cheering sounds of civilized industry resound from "early morn till dewy eve." In the midst of this scene of thrift and magnificence, beauteous as "pearls in emerald set," stands Idaho's capital, with her fifteen hundred, or more, inhabitants. Everything within and without her evidencing enterprise, taste, and prosperity. Hotels and restaurants, unsurpassed in commodiousness and luxury by any this side of Portland, afford homes of comfort for citizen and sojourner at reasonable prices. Stores rivalling those of Sacramento city, and stocks of goods, costly and elegant, supply the wants of the people and the demands of trade. Boot and shoe, and saddlery and harness making establishments; blacksmith and wagon shops; feed and livery stables; carpenter and wagon shops, all of which are conducted in as good style, and do as good and handsome work as is done anywhere, are found on every street, and add the value of their productions to her wealth. Public halls, libraries, public and private schools, churches, charitable and benevolent societies; physicians eminent in their profession, clergymen whose efforts would be creditable in an older and wealthier community; and ladies and gentlemen of the highest culture, testify of her progressive intelligence, and enhance the attractions of her society. Gardens, orchards, groves, water ditches, and a hundred charmingly beautiful homes, shaded by little clumps of trees, deciduous, and evergreen, and in the summer season, wreathed in flowers of every beauteous hue, and fragrant with every delicious odor. All these and much more has Boise City to commend her to the unbiased observer, and all created by the genius and toil of her citizens." Daily lines of stages connect it with the C. P. E. R. at Winnemucca, in Nevada, 400 miles distant, and at Kelton, in Utah, and with surrounding camps. The Legislature meets biennially, in odd numbered years. One newspaper, the Idaho Statesman, is published tri-weekly.

Agnew & Race, livery stable
Allen —, carpenter
Anderson Benjamin, carpenter
Anthony H, carpenter
Arnold D, dentist
Baldwin & Hemphill, blacksmiths, and wagon makers
Barheydt H, painter
Basil M, wheelwright
Bayhouse William, boots, shoes, and leather
Bayhouse & Mobley, barbers
Beck Samuel, liquor saloon
Beckhardt Frederick, carpenter
Bennett J A & Co, butchers
Blizard D, livery stable
Boise River Lumber Co, lumber manufacturers
Broadbent John B, watch maker, and jeweler
Brumback Jeremiah, attorney at law
Brumm G W, watch maker, and jeweler
Bryan Edward, baths
Byrd M, carpenter
Cahalon T D, attorney at law
Cartee L F, fruit trees, and nursery
Case J, produce and grain
Coffin F R & Co, stoves, hardware, agricultural implements, and sewing machines
Cohen P, general merchandise
Cohen P Mrs, varieties
Corbus F, carpenter
Coyle Andrew, liquor saloon
Curry Isaac B, photographer
Curtis E J, attorney at law
Dangel Frederick, bakery, and liquor saloon
De Lord S, liquor saloon
Death S R, groceries
Dymoke James, sewing machines
Early John, stock dealer
Ellis George, carpenter
Engelhart George, carpenter
Falk D & Brother, general merchandise
First National Bank of Idaho, B F. Channell, president,
C W Moore, cashier
Flanagan Brothers, brick manufacturers
Fontez Manuel, liquor saloon
Ford T J, (Ford's Station), hotel
Frood Thomas, livery stable
Gess George W & Co, butchers
Gordon J H, restaurant
Gray & Huston, attorneys at law
Greene J H T, hotel
Griffin James W, hotel
Hagar J & Co, furniture
Hannah W H, attorney at law
Hart James H, liquor saloon
Hart William, restaurant
Heard James, brick mason
Heed Albert, attorney at law
Hoffman L, tailor
Howell Charles, livery and feed stable
Hewlett R E, lumber and commission
Humphrey J, watches, jewelry, and firearms
Hunt C, feed stable
IDAHO STATESMAN, Milton Kelly, proprietor
Isaacs A C Mrs, millinery and dress goods
Isaacs J C, provisions
Jacobs Cyrus, provisions, flouring mill, and distillery
Jackson J H, blacksmith, and wagon maker
James William R, butcher
Jauman William, liquor saloon
KELLY MILTON, proprietor Idaho Statesman
Kelly Stillman, liquor saloon
Landit T, carpenter
Lawrence F J, liquor saloon
Lemp John, brewery, and liquor saloon
Levy Davis, liquors, and groceries
Logan Thomas E, general merchandise
Logan W H, photographer
Marston A J, blacksmith, and wagon maker
McHenry T, brick mason
Millman M, wood yard
Misseld Joseph H, brewery
Monson A B, furniture, and cabinet maker
MORRIS WILLIAM B, agent Wells, Fargo & Co., and superintendent Northwestern Stage Co.
Morse W, feed stable
Murry & Co, butchers
Nelson Charles, hay, grain, and stock dealer
Nye William H & Co, drugs, medicines, paints, oils, etc
Oldham & Taylor, billiard and liquor saloon
Ostner J Mrs, millinery, and dress making
Paynton John, gunsmith
Pefly P J, harness, and saddlery
Pinney James A, books, stationery, cutlery, toys, cigars, and notions
Pollard John, boots and shoes
Post John A, postmaster
Prickett Henry E, attorney at law
Reed R B & Co, general merchandise
Rossi A, lumber manufacturer
Schnabel & Bilderback, general merchandise
Scholl L, justice of the peace, and teacher music
Schwabacher & Co, general merchandise
Sheffer & Co, candy, nuts, tobacco, and toys
Sinclair J, tailor
Slocum J, hay, and grain
Smith Ephraim, physician
Smith & Kelley, attorneys at law
Smith & Taft, drugs and medicines
Snow T N, physician
Sonna P, hardware, iron, steel, and groceries
Spiegel David, groceries
Spiegel S, varieties
Stevens John L, physician
Stilts G W. blacksmith, wagons, tobacco, etc
Stooles J, boot maker
Taft J. physician
Tatro W C, livery stable
Taylor & Peyton, liquor saloon
Thompson H, blacksmith
Treadwell E, physician
Turner, A P, hotel
Twogood James H, agricultural implements, and sewing machines
Weinheimer — Mrs, dress maker
Welsh Jacob, house and carriage painter
Williams Barrett, lumber
Williams & Parker, livery stable
Woods J E, blacksmith

See page image from Langley's Directory at archive.org




About AHGP

Webspace for this site is generously provided by Genealogy Village and Access Genealogy

Copyright © 2013 - Sharon McConnel. All Rights Reserved.